Topics

ambe #ambeserver

Charles Wiant
 

when i close terminal ambe server quits working any ideas

VE3WVJ
 
Edited

make sure to type "&" after the command you want to run. This makes it run in the background. So you would need to type "AMBEServer &" in the terminal without the quotes to make it run after you close the terminal. Do not put the quotations. just type the command that is inside the quotations. 

Type this into the Terminal:

AMBEServer &

This should run the application in the background.. You can check that it is running using:

ps aux | grep AMBEServer


You only need the & symbol if you wish to run the process in the background. regardless of if you close the terminal window or not. I hope this helps!

 

Bill
VE3WVJ

Mike Norrbom
 

You can also install the screen utility.

 

https://linuxize.com/post/how-to-use-linux-screen/

 

I use it for many linux programs.

 

Thanks,

Mike (N0VZC)

 

 

 

From: ambe@nw-digital-radio.groups.io <ambe@nw-digital-radio.groups.io> On Behalf Of VE3WVJ
Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2019 11:06 PM
To: ambe@nw-digital-radio.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ambe] ambe #ambeserver

 

[Edited Message Follows]

make sure to type "&" after the command you want to run. This makes it run in the background. So you would need to type "AMBEServer &" in the terminal without the quotes to make it run after you close the terminal. Do not put the quotations. just type the command that is inside the quotations. 

Type this into the Terminal:

AMBEServer &

This should run the application in the background.. You can check that it is running using:

ps aux | grep AMBEServer


You only need the & symbol if you wish to run the process in the background. regardless of if you close the terminal window or not. I hope this helps!

 

Bill
VE3WVJ

VE3WVJ
 
Edited

screen utility is good.. also there is byobu for linux command line. byobu is a great screen multiplexer that works on the console. I like it because you can have terminal windows side by side like with screen but you get more information at the bottom of the window with byobu. also byobu has mouse functionality with point and click to choose window and it is more user friendly in my opinion. screen is just as good at what it does also, but my choice is with byobu.

install both of them and try them out

Type:

sudo apt install screen byobu -y

To get a list of the commands used with each program type:

screen --help

or

byobu --help


both applications use [Ctrl+a then a command] to control them. There are various write-ups online about them. 


Information is priceless...


Bill

VE3WVJ

73

 

 Systemd Management of AMBEserver

A set of files for systemd management are located in the files section of the ambe subgroup on groups.ioambesupport.tgz

Download this file to the target computer's filesystem and run 
mv ambesupport.tgz /tmp &&  cd / && sudo tar -xzvf /tmp/ambesupport.tgz

Configuration File Location

The systemd configuration files for AMBEserver are located in /etc/opendv

cd /etc/opendv
ls -1

ambeserver-ttyAMA0.conf
ambeserver-ttyS0.conf
ambeserver-ttyUSB0.conf

If your device is at a different location, e.g. /dev/ttyUSB1 simply copy the similar file and give it a new name with the new device

sudo cp ambeserver-ttyUSB0.conf ambeserver-ttyUSB1.conf	

Modifying the Configuration File

Use an editor like vi or nano to edit your configuration file

sudo vi /etc/opendv/ambeserver-ttyUSB0.conf	

There are two environment variables that may be modified namely UDP_PORT and AMBESERVER_FLAGS

Here are the contents of the configuration file:

#
# Configuration file for the AMBEserver program started by systemd.
# Adding flags to AMBESERVER_FLAGS will pass this to the daemon.
# For example, to change the speed to 460800, use the following line:
# AMBESERVER_FLAGS="-s 460800"
#

UDP_PORT=2460
AMBESERVER_FLAGS=""

For example, on the newer ThumbDV™ (Rev. A) you would modify the AMBESERVER_FLAGS variable

AMBESERVER_FLAGS="-s 460800"	

To have AMBEserver listen on another UDP port, which is useful if you have more than one AMBEserver running on a single Raspberry Pi -- each with its own AMBE device.

UDP_PORT=18307	

Managing the AMBEserver

The commands for checking, starting, stopping, enabling, and disabling the AMBEserver are as follows:

sudo systemctl status ambeserver@...
sudo systemctl start ambeserver@...
sudo systemctl stop ambeserver@...
sudo systemctl enable ambeserver@...
sudo systemctl disable ambeserver@...

Modify the tty service name as appropriate by replacing ttyUSB0 with:

  • ttyAMA0 for a PiDV™ on on Raspberry Pi / Raspberry Pi 2
  • ttyS0 for a PiDV™ on the Raspberry Pi 3
  • ttyUSBx where x is a digit for the ThumbDV™ on all Linux based systems
Enabling the service will allow the AMBEserver to automatically restart when the Raspberry Pi is restarted.

-----
If using the command line to start ambeserver in a terminal shell, and you don't want it to go away when you disconnect or logout, use nohup before the command and an & after.  For an explanation of nohup, issue the command:

man nohup



John D. Hays
Kingston, WA
K7VE


Charles Wiant
 

Thanks to all ambe server is up and running

 

From: ambe@nw-digital-radio.groups.io <ambe@nw-digital-radio.groups.io> On Behalf Of John D Hays - K7VE
Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2019 12:48 AM
To: ambe@nw-digital-radio.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ambe] ambe #ambeserver

 

 Systemd Management of AMBEserver

 

A set of files for systemd management are located in the files section of the ambe subgroup on groups.ioambesupport.tgz


Download this file to the target computer's filesystem and run 

mv ambesupport.tgz /tmp &&  cd / && sudo tar -xzvf /tmp/ambesupport.tgz

 

Configuration File Location

The systemd configuration files for AMBEserver are located in /etc/opendv

cd /etc/opendv
ls -1

ambeserver-ttyAMA0.conf
ambeserver-ttyS0.conf
ambeserver-ttyUSB0.conf

If your device is at a different location, e.g. /dev/ttyUSB1 simply copy the similar file and give it a new name with the new device

sudo cp ambeserver-ttyUSB0.conf ambeserver-ttyUSB1.conf   

Modifying the Configuration File

Use an editor like vi or nano to edit your configuration file

sudo vi /etc/opendv/ambeserver-ttyUSB0.conf       

There are two environment variables that may be modified namely UDP_PORT and AMBESERVER_FLAGS

Here are the contents of the configuration file:

#
# Configuration file for the AMBEserver program started by systemd.
# Adding flags to AMBESERVER_FLAGS will pass this to the daemon.
# For example, to change the speed to 460800, use the following line:
# AMBESERVER_FLAGS="-s 460800"
#
 
UDP_PORT=2460
AMBESERVER_FLAGS=""

For example, on the newer ThumbDV™ (Rev. A) you would modify the AMBESERVER_FLAGS variable

AMBESERVER_FLAGS="-s 460800"      

To have AMBEserver listen on another UDP port, which is useful if you have more than one AMBEserver running on a single Raspberry Pi -- each with its own AMBE device.

UDP_PORT=18307   

Managing the AMBEserver

The commands for checking, starting, stopping, enabling, and disabling the AMBEserver are as follows:

sudo systemctl status ambeserver@...
sudo systemctl start ambeserver@...
sudo systemctl stop ambeserver@...
sudo systemctl enable ambeserver@...
sudo systemctl disable ambeserver@...

Modify the tty service name as appropriate by replacing ttyUSB0 with:

  • ttyAMA0 for a PiDV™ on on Raspberry Pi / Raspberry Pi 2
  • ttyS0 for a PiDV™ on the Raspberry Pi 3
  • ttyUSBx where x is a digit for the ThumbDV™ on all Linux based systems

Enabling the service will allow the AMBEserver to automatically restart when the Raspberry Pi is restarted.

 

-----

If using the command line to start ambeserver in a terminal shell, and you don't want it to go away when you disconnect or logout, use nohup before the command and an & after.  For an explanation of nohup, issue the command:

 

man nohup

 

 


John D. Hays
Kingston, WA

K7VE