Date   
Re: RF access point application confirmation

"John D. Hays" <john@...>
 

Ken,

Raw TCP/IP packets will need some kind of synchronization training sequence at the beginning.  Right now we have two Amateur protocols that provide framing around TCP/IP and handle the synchronization as part of their frames.

TCP/IP runs within a UI AX.25 frame.
TCP/IP runs within Ethernet Frames inside of D-STAR frames.

This will be in our early releases.  

We believe there is plenty of opportunity to create more robust and efficient air protocols, e.g. forward error correction, header compression (ala IPv6), more efficient modems, etc. and we invite developers and experimenters to do so.  Our system is open to allow such development and experimentation.  So, if one has the skill to develop and support such improvements we are all for it.

On Sun, Mar 1, 2015 at 11:48 PM, dsp_stap@... [UniversalDigitalRadio] <UniversalDigitalRadio@...> wrote:
 

--- Michael E Fox - N6MEF wrote:
> The UDRX-440 functions as either a layer 2 bridge or a layer 3 router.

I'm interested only in TCP/IP, not AX.25 or D-Star.  So I have the same question.

If the radio doesn't yet have that capability, I assume it will be possible to write software to make it so (even if that requires re-transmitting packets on the same, or different, frequency).  Is that correct?

73,
Ken N8KH

PS  Part of mesh networking will be the link layer, and connecting/solving the hidden node problem.  Not all nodes should be connected; aggregate network bandwidth can be higher, and the users served better, under an optimal link layer solution, rather than an everybody connected to everybody link layer solution.  This is still a very active area of research in which amateur radio operators could contribute a great deal -- if only we had the hardware to experiment with.

__._,


John D. Hays
K7VE

PO Box 1223, Edmonds, WA 98020-1223 
  

How Open? How Free? OpenBSD? NetBSD?

dsp_stap@...
 

How open/free will the platform be?

Will I be able to port OpenBSD, compile all of the device drivers, and have the computer/radio run on OpenBSD instead of Linux?  (Requiring GPL for some software is fine with me, and even preferred, to make sure it stays open and free.)

(I prefer OpenBSD for all interfaces to the outside world, for its greater security.  A radio interface is certainly an interface to the outside world.)

How will the system boot?  U-Boot?  PXE?  Either?

Will it be possible to completely control/configure the system via text-based files, or will the web server be required?  If I want to, can I disable the web server, and control it via text-based files in /etc?  I don't mind if the GUI is provided for other people to use, but I prefer a traditional text-based interface for myself.

73,
Ken N8KH

PS  Having NetBSD ported to the platform would be another feather in your cap.  And you don't have to do the work.  The NetBSD folks will do it for you if you are open enough.

PPS  I'm interested in helping to develop mobile ad-hoc mesh networking algorithms and protocols.  I also do DSP.

PPPS  I'm also interested in the next generation radio, which should be capable of roughly 400 kHz - 1 MHz of instantaneous bandwidth, and correspondly higher data rates, perhaps on the microwave bands.

Re: RF access point application confirmation

dsp_stap@...
 

--- Michael E Fox - N6MEF wrote:
> The UDRX-440 functions as either a layer 2 bridge or a layer 3 router.

I'm interested only in TCP/IP, not AX.25 or D-Star.  So I have the same question.

If the radio doesn't yet have that capability, I assume it will be possible to write software to make it so (even if that requires re-transmitting packets on the same, or different, frequency).  Is that correct?

73,
Ken N8KH

PS  Part of mesh networking will be the link layer, and connecting/solving the hidden node problem.  Not all nodes should be connected; aggregate network bandwidth can be higher, and the users served better, under an optimal link layer solution, rather than an everybody connected to everybody link layer solution.  This is still a very active area of research in which amateur radio operators could contribute a great deal -- if only we had the hardware to experiment with.

Re: 44 addresses / JNOS 56K / Gateway Security ?

Bill Vodall <wa7nwp@...>
 

That was fun...

1.5 billion earthlings find social networks a bit more interesting..
Compare that to the 15 or so folks still on packet radio.. The
multi-media multi-mode communications web application (Facebook and
more) is the exciting future..
Just rediscovered the "NW DIgital Radio" Facebook group and invited a
hundred or so of my closest ham friends.. That's one little step
toward moving beyond the 20th century...

Bill, WA7NWP

Re: 44 addresses / JNOS 56K / Gateway Security ?

Bill Vodall <wa7nwp@...>
 

A few years ago, there was a crash at the National Championship Air Races in
Reno, NV, injured dozens, killed a few. I wasn't there... I was 10 miles
away at the time; Yet, the cell network was down, and I couldn't make calls
or send texts. My amateur radio saved the day,
I had a similar experience when, several years ago, we had a nasty
windstorm that nailed the power grid and it was lights out for 5 days.
That's when I realized that Ham Radio with APRS was THE ultimate
situational awareness information tool. It still is.

The promise of talking to Australia got me to get my
license when I was young... But I still haven't done it, because 15 years later...
It was just this week that we on a different discussion list realized
that an experimental HF SDR data radio system can now be had for less
than $200... That would be a RXTX three band transceiver and a new
RPI 2. I know that station will easily WSPR to Australia, probably
WSJT or APRS-messenger and maybe even on APRS HF packet with the new
bit correcting software.

Are we having fun yet?

Bill

Re: 44 addresses / JNOS 56K / Gateway Security ?

Bill Vodall <wa7nwp@...>
 

Had you said "We wanna make a facebook-like social network," that would have
been one thing... It's probably a "Thing" that would be popular for a few
minutes in a few geographic regions before following BBS' 1998 journey into
obscurity, but it would be a thing none the less.
1.5 billion earthlings find social networks a bit more interesting..
Compare that to the 15 or so folks still on packet radio.. The
multi-media multi-mode communications web application (Facebook and
more) is the exciting future..

But that's a far cry from telling the high schoolers that they can Facebook
on Ham Radio; Merely making the statement could be a liability, because what
happens when they take you literally?
I would love to see a hand full of high schoolers doing Facebook
across town on Ham Radio. It would be an awesome accomplishment and
probably one of the high points for the year.

The unfortunate twist is that Ham Radio isn't needed for it. That's
all available with COTS cheap hardware. It could be shoehorned into a
pseudo Ham Radio project with some small advantages but then it would
be quickly shot down.

Not to mention the fact that Facebook uses all kinds of media types that
aren't well suited for this bandwidth... And once all restrictions pan out,
it won't really be very Facebook like. In fact, it will be fairly BBS
like... And as previously mentioned, that lost its allure about two decades
ago.
What bandwidth restrictions? With a bit of creativity we can do
fractional gigabits. Even limiting it to the technology sponsoring
this discussion - crafty multicasting and caching techniques can
provide far more than the apparent native speeds.

So again... What real traffic will this network carry?
IM, CHAT, Email, pictures, files, database replication, federated
wiki's, audio, ham radio now presentations.. Everything...

And if it's just
EmComm stuff... I'm on board, I'll set up a node... But I won't be comparing
it to Facebook, and I sure won't be presenting it to the younger generation
as any kind of revolutionary wave of the future.
We have far more potential than that... If we don't do it - we might
as well just move over to running CW emulators on some Skype channel.

Bill

Re: 44 addresses / JNOS 56K / Gateway Security ?

"Tyrell Jentink, KD7KUJ" <tyrell@...>
 

A few years ago, there was a crash at the National Championship Air Races in Reno, NV, injured dozens, killed a few.  I wasn't there... I was 10 miles away at the time; Yet, the cell network was down, and I couldn't make calls or send texts. My amateur radio saved the day, not only getting me directions to where I needed to go, but also kept me updated faster, and with more accurate information than the news was providing.

I was the president of the student amateur radio club at the University of Nevada. That story excited kids at conventions, but it didn't even attract new hams from the Red Cross club (Although, we did get 2 people from the Doomsday Prepper club... But I think they were interested before I talked to them). The IEEE kids looked at us like we were some relic of the past, and they looked at our shack like it was a museum. I heard a resounding "I don't wanna take ANOTHER test, just to get to play with technology that my cell phone laughs at, just in the off chance that we have another city wide emergency like the plane crash."

We shouldn't have to emulate the commercial world... But EmComm isn't attracting the kids. The promise of talking to Australia got me to get my license when I was young... But I still haven't done it, because 15 years later, I still can't afford an HF radio. There are a lot of half-baked promises built into this hobby... Things that sound like they should attract new people, but when faced with the reality of time and money prioritization, just don't pan out with the majority of young people.

We need creativity. We need something that has a coolness factor that can't be beat by the commercial world. In the '80s and '90s, packet seemed to meet that description... But we haven't done anything revolutionary since the iPhone.

On Feb 27, 2015 7:09 AM, "ve7dhm@... [UniversalDigitalRadio]" <UniversalDigitalRadio@...> wrote:
 

Amateur radio was/is portable/mobile/base station radios giving those
who can pass an exam the capability to talk across town or around
the world using voice and data. No infrastructure required.

Commercial development morphed it into a capability for the masses. So
now a greater part of everyones paycheck goes to pay for their monthly
communication expense than when it was landlines and over the air TV.
A huge infrastructure is required.

A friend went to an emergency planning group meeting and as he was
describing 1200 baud packet radio, the equipment, the nodes for
extending communication range, and the application software a couple
of IT guys at the table scoffed at the idea of using such a slow
system for an EOC emergency message system as a backup.  The friend
walked over to the IT guys and handed them a pencil and piece of paper
and said well then you had better start learning to write real fast
because that's all you are left with when infrastructure fails.

So maybe showing the kids of the world a UDRX-440 based network isn't
so bad after all.  It doesn't have to mirror the commercial world...
where is the innovation in that?  But it certainly has the potential
capability of handling text, voice, pictures, GPS data faster than
writing with a pencil.

Revolutionary....no monthly user fee and the capability to keep working
when the infrastructure fails....something to show the kids.

Paul VE7DHM

Re: 44 addresses / JNOS 56K / Gateway Security ?

ve7dhm@...
 

Amateur radio was/is portable/mobile/base station radios giving those
who can pass an exam the capability to talk across town or around
the world using voice and data. No infrastructure required.

Commercial development morphed it into a capability for the masses. So
now a greater part of everyones paycheck goes to pay for their monthly
communication expense than when it was landlines and over the air TV.
A huge infrastructure is required.

A friend went to an emergency planning group meeting and as he was
describing 1200 baud packet radio, the equipment, the nodes for
extending communication range, and the application software a couple
of IT guys at the table scoffed at the idea of using such a slow
system for an EOC emergency message system as a backup.  The friend
walked over to the IT guys and handed them a pencil and piece of paper
and said well then you had better start learning to write real fast
because that's all you are left with when infrastructure fails.

So maybe showing the kids of the world a UDRX-440 based network isn't
so bad after all.  It doesn't have to mirror the commercial world...
where is the innovation in that?  But it certainly has the potential
capability of handling text, voice, pictures, GPS data faster than
writing with a pencil.

Revolutionary....no monthly user fee and the capability to keep working
when the infrastructure fails....something to show the kids.

Paul VE7DHM

Re: 44 addresses / JNOS 56K / Gateway Security ?

ve7dhm@...
 

Well, thanks for the feedback.  All comments interesting.

44 allocation request: I have a request in at portal.amp.org
The BC admin emailed me and after some discussion he forward
my allocation request up to Luc Pernot.  That's where that
stands.

Existing LAN or my own LAN.  Just trying to find out what other
UDRX-440 users plan to do in the Puget Sound area.  Yes I could
do my own thing.  But considering what was in place years gone
by with the 1200 baud 2M / 220 / 440 Vancouver/Victoria/Seattle
packet system I was wondering if it might be able to rebuild it
but having increased speed / capacity.  This would require some
frequency and IP co-ordination.

Basil, N7NIX, thanks for the WL2K message.  Great to see there is
a 2M path between us.  Looking forward to trying the UDRX-440 between
us.

John, K7VE, thanks for the info and yes the map says it all.  Once
the UDRX-440 hits the street I am sure more orders will follow to
get in on the action.  After some initial testing my plan is to give
a presentation, to several groups in the Victoria area, on how the
UDRX-440 can be used to supplement or replace existing equipment.
1200 baud 2M and or 440 packet is in all 10 municipal EOCs and 3
districts over here on southern Vancouver Island.  An interesting
project would to make it a UDRX-440 MESH network with also mobile
units.

Richard, VE7CVS, thanks for the comments.  Lots to play with and lots
to learn...just like the long past years of VARPA and VAPO when packet
radio was new.  Back a few years ago I helped setup a local network,
using ID-1s for the Swiftsure Yacht Race.  The rounding mark vessels
where equipped with a laptop, ID-1, antenna, and camera.  I setup an
ID-1 on a hill top with a wifi link back to my house as a gateway.
The hams on the boats took photos and short length videos and ftp the
files back to a server.  Many megabytes of data were successfully sent
to the server.  The rocking of the boats caused some problems but the
fog really killed the ID-1 signal when it rolled by down the strait!
It was an interesting experiment and fun to do.  Really looking
forward to playing with the UDRX-440.

Paul VE7DHM

Re: 44 addresses / JNOS 56K / Gateway Security ?

"Tyrell Jentink, KD7KUJ" <tyrell@...>
 

Had you said "We wanna make a facebook-like social network," that would have been one thing... It's probably a "Thing" that would be popular for a few minutes in a few geographic regions before following BBS' 1998 journey into obscurity, but it would be a thing none the less.

But that's a far cry from telling the high schoolers that they can Facebook on Ham Radio; Merely making the statement could be a liability, because what happens when they take you literally?

Not to mention the fact that Facebook uses all kinds of media types that aren't well suited for this bandwidth... And once all restrictions pan out, it won't really be very Facebook like. In fact, it will be fairly BBS like... And as previously mentioned, that lost its allure about two decades ago.

So again... What real traffic will this network carry? And if it's just EmComm stuff... I'm on board, I'll set up a node... But I won't be comparing it to Facebook, and I sure won't be presenting it to the younger generation as any kind of revolutionary wave of the future.

On Feb 26, 2015 11:36 AM, "Bill Vodall wa7nwp@... [UniversalDigitalRadio]" <UniversalDigitalRadio@...> wrote:
 

>> > So what are people planning on doing once a 56k mesh network exists?
>> > What
>> > kind of traffic will it carry?
>>
>> Facebook and much more... With RF multicast to take advantage of our
>> spectrum resources instead of the old one-to-one model that so
>> hindered the previous generations of tools.
>>
>> Bill, WA7NWP

> Facebook uses HTTPS, which is encrypted, and is definitely designed to
> "Obscure the meaning of the message," and is definitely against the rules in
> the US.

That's an implementation detail. Our better version can be and do
what we want... It's the concept, and beyond, that we need to work
on.

Bill

Re: 44 addresses / JNOS 56K / Gateway Security ?

Bill Vodall <wa7nwp@...>
 

So what are people planning on doing once a 56k mesh network exists?
What
kind of traffic will it carry?
Facebook and much more... With RF multicast to take advantage of our
spectrum resources instead of the old one-to-one model that so
hindered the previous generations of tools.

Bill, WA7NWP
Facebook uses HTTPS, which is encrypted, and is definitely designed to
"Obscure the meaning of the message," and is definitely against the rules in
the US.
That's an implementation detail. Our better version can be and do
what we want... It's the concept, and beyond, that we need to work
on.

Bill

Re: 44 addresses / JNOS 56K / Gateway Security ?

"Tyrell Jentink, KD7KUJ" <tyrell@...>
 

Facebook uses HTTPS, which is encrypted, and is definitely designed to "Obscure the meaning of the message," and is definitely against the rules in the US.

On Feb 26, 2015 11:00 AM, "Bill Vodall wa7nwp@... [UniversalDigitalRadio]" <UniversalDigitalRadio@...> wrote:
 

> So what are people planning on doing once a 56k mesh network exists? What
> kind of traffic will it carry?

Facebook and much more... With RF multicast to take advantage of our
spectrum resources instead of the old one-to-one model that so
hindered the previous generations of tools.

Bill, WA7NWP

Re: 44 addresses / JNOS 56K / Gateway Security ?

Bill Vodall <wa7nwp@...>
 

So what are people planning on doing once a 56k mesh network exists? What
kind of traffic will it carry?
Facebook and much more... With RF multicast to take advantage of our
spectrum resources instead of the old one-to-one model that so
hindered the previous generations of tools.

Bill, WA7NWP

Re: 44 addresses / JNOS 56K / Gateway Security ?

"John D. Hays" <john@...>
 

BTW, Chris (G1FEF) is actively looking for people willing to help enhance portal.ampr.org

LAMP experience is helpful.


On Thu, Feb 26, 2015 at 8:31 AM, 'Tyrell Jentink, KD7KUJ' tyrell@... [UniversalDigitalRadio] <UniversalDigitalRadio@...> wrote:
 

I've always wanted to play with 44net. I mean, I really have no idea what I expect to achieve... I feel like reviving the BBS network of the past would be counterproductive for the Advancement of the Radio Art... Yet, at the same time, relying on the internet isn't good for the resilience of communication in general. It seems that the 44.x allocation had good intentions, and it certainly seems that amateur radio pushed the advancement of internet technologies early on, but we have dropped the ball. We need something creative if we want to become relevant again.

So what are people planning on doing once a 56k mesh network exists? What kind of traffic will it carry?

On Feb 25, 2015 11:03 PM, "myyahoo@... [UniversalDigitalRadio]" <UniversalDigitalRadio@...> wrote:
 

Something that we need to influence when the UDRs start shipping in quantity. I have a 44.x net allocation for the old 56kbps network (I was last on there in 1998) in the Vancouver area but we may need to look at different routing mechanisms as mesh networking becomes a reality, and gateways to the network will be more varied and variable. Guess I'll have to study up on BGP. Good thing I work at a company that has a 'past' with BGP... Don't have a CCIE - yet...

I'm now in San Jose, CA, so I also need go write the local exams to get 'local' and confuse things less when we form a network here. Think I've said this before. :-)

If the political processes are not working, it may be because no one is interested in supporting and maintaining them. That may be fixed by offering to step up to the plate - but then again, there is frequency coordination... not been a lot of hope in that area. (We will need to push there too. ;-)

If the 44.x net progress has stagnated, new blood may be able to effect some change (politics notwithstanding). Some of us associated with this project have been associated with packet radio since the early days and may be able to effect some gentle pressure among friends to help things move along. If not, there are alternatives (e.g., 10.x net and NAT/PAT) that can get us running without employing the 44.x net, at least initially, if we need IPv4 address space, and IPv6 is wide open. Getting a piece of 44.x allocated to this effort would be another alternative. We don't have to clean up the whole 16M address space, if we were to get a 64K slice we'd serve the continent for a millennium or three. :-)

BTW - we're really pushing to use IPv6 here (the on-air footprint could be critical to performance, with IPv6 header compression), where one subnet is the size of the *entire* IPv4 space, but we'll likely need some IPv4 space for a while to tide us over for maybe the next decade until the Internet becomes more IPv6 aware. Some 6-to-4 conversion will be likely to boost performance while retaining compatibility. We only really need numerous IPv4 addresses for inbound-to-ham-net connections, PAT can help solve outbound - but we need to control those inbound connections, to prevent non-ham-legal content from traversing the ham links. Software for this already exists, in one form or another.

- Richard, VE7CVS (/W6)




--


John D. Hays
K7VE

PO Box 1223, Edmonds, WA 98020-1223 
  

Re: 44 addresses / JNOS 56K / Gateway Security ?

"Tyrell Jentink, KD7KUJ" <tyrell@...>
 

I've always wanted to play with 44net. I mean, I really have no idea what I expect to achieve... I feel like reviving the BBS network of the past would be counterproductive for the Advancement of the Radio Art... Yet, at the same time, relying on the internet isn't good for the resilience of communication in general. It seems that the 44.x allocation had good intentions, and it certainly seems that amateur radio pushed the advancement of internet technologies early on, but we have dropped the ball. We need something creative if we want to become relevant again.

So what are people planning on doing once a 56k mesh network exists? What kind of traffic will it carry?

On Feb 25, 2015 11:03 PM, "myyahoo@... [UniversalDigitalRadio]" <UniversalDigitalRadio@...> wrote:
 

Something that we need to influence when the UDRs start shipping in quantity. I have a 44.x net allocation for the old 56kbps network (I was last on there in 1998) in the Vancouver area but we may need to look at different routing mechanisms as mesh networking becomes a reality, and gateways to the network will be more varied and variable. Guess I'll have to study up on BGP. Good thing I work at a company that has a 'past' with BGP... Don't have a CCIE - yet...

I'm now in San Jose, CA, so I also need go write the local exams to get 'local' and confuse things less when we form a network here. Think I've said this before. :-)

If the political processes are not working, it may be because no one is interested in supporting and maintaining them. That may be fixed by offering to step up to the plate - but then again, there is frequency coordination... not been a lot of hope in that area. (We will need to push there too. ;-)

If the 44.x net progress has stagnated, new blood may be able to effect some change (politics notwithstanding). Some of us associated with this project have been associated with packet radio since the early days and may be able to effect some gentle pressure among friends to help things move along. If not, there are alternatives (e.g., 10.x net and NAT/PAT) that can get us running without employing the 44.x net, at least initially, if we need IPv4 address space, and IPv6 is wide open. Getting a piece of 44.x allocated to this effort would be another alternative. We don't have to clean up the whole 16M address space, if we were to get a 64K slice we'd serve the continent for a millennium or three. :-)

BTW - we're really pushing to use IPv6 here (the on-air footprint could be critical to performance, with IPv6 header compression), where one subnet is the size of the *entire* IPv4 space, but we'll likely need some IPv4 space for a while to tide us over for maybe the next decade until the Internet becomes more IPv6 aware. Some 6-to-4 conversion will be likely to boost performance while retaining compatibility. We only really need numerous IPv4 addresses for inbound-to-ham-net connections, PAT can help solve outbound - but we need to control those inbound connections, to prevent non-ham-legal content from traversing the ham links. Software for this already exists, in one form or another.

- Richard, VE7CVS (/W6)

Re: 44 addresses / JNOS 56K / Gateway Security ?

myyahoo@...
 

Something that we need to influence when the UDRs start shipping in quantity. I have a 44.x net allocation for the old 56kbps network (I was last on there in 1998) in the Vancouver area but we may need to look at different routing mechanisms as mesh networking becomes a reality, and gateways to the network will be more varied and variable. Guess I'll have to study up on BGP. Good thing I work at a company that has a 'past' with BGP... Don't have a CCIE - yet...

I'm now in San Jose, CA, so I also need go write the local exams to get 'local' and confuse things less when we form a network here. Think I've said this before. :-)

If the political processes are not working, it may be because no one is interested in supporting and maintaining them. That may be fixed by offering to step up to the plate - but then again, there is frequency coordination... not been a lot of hope in that area. (We will need to push there too. ;-)

If the 44.x net progress has stagnated, new blood may be able to effect some change (politics notwithstanding). Some of us associated with this project have been associated with packet radio since the early days and may be able to effect some gentle pressure among friends to help things move along. If not, there are alternatives (e.g., 10.x net and NAT/PAT) that can get us running without employing the 44.x net, at least initially, if we need IPv4 address space, and IPv6 is wide open. Getting a piece of 44.x allocated to this effort would be another alternative. We don't have to clean up the whole 16M address space, if we were to get a 64K slice we'd serve the continent for a millennium or three. :-)

BTW - we're really pushing to use IPv6 here (the on-air footprint could be critical to performance, with IPv6 header compression), where one subnet is the size of the *entire* IPv4 space, but we'll likely need some IPv4 space for a while to tide us over for maybe the next decade until the Internet becomes more IPv6 aware. Some 6-to-4 conversion will be likely to boost performance while retaining compatibility. We only really need numerous IPv4 addresses for inbound-to-ham-net connections, PAT can help solve outbound - but we need to control those inbound connections, to prevent non-ham-legal content from traversing the ham links. Software for this already exists, in one form or another.

- Richard, VE7CVS (/W6)

Re: 44 addresses / JNOS 56K / Gateway Security ?

basil@...
 


> Who else, if anyone, plans to use 44 address scheme in the Pacific North West around the Puget Sound?

> Paul VE7DHM


I have good path to your ve7rsk-10 RMS Gateway in Shirley, BC from the west side of Lopez Island, WA.

I sent you a Winlink message, respond if you want to try some things out. Try connecting to n7nix-10 on 144.970.


/Basil n7nix

Re: 44 addresses / JNOS 56K / Gateway Security ?

basil@...
 

> I live in the San Juan Islands on Lopez Is. 
> Do you have a gateway or are you playing standalone?

Standalone until I get my fiber connection within a couple of months.

> Any coverage to the South?

It's marginal and likely dependent on tropospheric ducting.
I think there is a lot of interference coming from Whidby Is. challenging any possibilities.
 
/Basil

Re: 44 addresses / JNOS 56K / Gateway Security ?

Bill Vodall <wa7nwp@...>
 

dropped my membership in the 44.net mailing list. Not that it had much effect; nothing's going on there.

So where is it going on and being done better?


Bill, WA7NWP

Re: 44 addresses / JNOS 56K / Gateway Security ?

Dean Gibson AE7Q <yahu.stuff@...>
 

On 2015-02-25 14:25, Tom Hayward esarfl@... [UniversalDigitalRadio] wrote:
On Wed, Feb 25, 2015 at 1:29 PM, Dean Gibson AE7Q yahu.stuff@...
[UniversalDigitalRadio] <UniversalDigitalRadio@...> wrote:
That's an understatement. The whole 44 thing is (functionally) a joke. Promises for minor changes are still not made after a year.

I know this is a hobby, but if you are going to try to interest new amateurs (especially those with a network background), don't ever tell them about the 44.net. I finally dropped my membership in the 44.net mailing list. Not that it had much effect; nothing's going on there.
44net has ... an apparent reluctance to change. ...
If you don't like how something is done, just make your own
arrangements.

Tom KD7LXL
EXACTLY.

-- Dean