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"John D. Hays" <john@...>
 

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John D. Hays
K7VE
PO Box 1223, Edmonds, WA 98020-1223 
  

GPL source code

Jerald A DeLong <kd4yal@...>
 

Good Morning,

I am interested in your product and I would like to know were I could
download the following:

* complete toolchain that made the kernel and applications be compiled
(gcc, binutils, libc)

* tools to build a custom firmware.

* kernel sources with patches to make it run on this specific
hardware, this does not include binary drivers


Thank you very much in advance for your answer.



Best regards, Jerald A DeLong, KD4YAL

Re: Processor architecture, gnuradio

Darren Long <darren.long@...>
 

Hi John,

Thanks for the info.

I hadn't got my hopes up for using the rig as an SDR, but I was mostly curious about what software I might be able to run on it, and what other gadgets I might connect to its multitude of ports. Having a bunch of USB attached SDRs and knowing that radios like the Ettus USRP E100 run gnuradio on ARM architecture made me wonder what else could be bolted on to keep the CPU busy when it's not thrashing away on 70cm.

I've been using a Sheevaplug for a number of years running Debian and have been through a fair range of Nokias Linux devices too.  I have worked my way through a number of failed SD cards in that time-frame with those devices, but the MTDs used in them  have never let me down.  I assume the SD card would be accessible enough to replace in case of failure, even if it was too awkward to swap on a regular basis.

It may be time to see if I can get the Sheevaplug to do anything useful with the Funcube Dongle SDR and other gadgets.

Keep up the good work,

Cheers,

Darren, G0HWW





On 10/06/12 01:22, John D. Hays wrote:
 

In line.

On Sat, Jun 9, 2012 at 7:41 AM, Darren Long <darren.long@...> wrote:
 

Hi,

Can we get any ideas on what processor architecture,

Marvell PXA168
 

amount of RAM and


Currently 256 MB, may be 512 MB in production, depending on price curve for memory
 

internal storage the device will have, please.

microSD - probably 4 GB. It is user replaceable (not recommended), but not easily accessed (internal) -- watch for tested Manufacturer / Model.  Not all microSD are recommended for a boot device. I have a 8 GB in my lab bench unit, loaded with a development chain (compiler, linker, libraries), OS, and many applications and haven't hit 2 GB yet. 
 

Even the vaguest hints
are welcome at this stage. I'm wondering if gnuradio might find its way
in there somehow.

It is not a software defined radio.  Modulation is performed inside the RF-IC. We really like what SDR does, but for VHF/UHF+ digital modulation there are well known techniques and the RF-IC supports most of them. Using built-in modulators keeps part count and cost down.
 

Darren, G0HWW




John D. Hays
K7VE
PO Box 1223, Edmonds, WA 98020-1223 

Re: GPL source code

"k7udr" <bhhoyer@...>
 

As the product is still in active development, the information you need will not be released until a month or two after first customer shipped. Thanks for your patience.

Bryan

--- In UniversalDigitalRadio@..., Jerald A DeLong <kd4yal@...> wrote:

Good Morning,

I am interested in your product and I would like to know were I could
download the following:

* complete toolchain that made the kernel and applications be compiled
(gcc, binutils, libc)

* tools to build a custom firmware.

* kernel sources with patches to make it run on this specific
hardware, this does not include binary drivers


Thank you very much in advance for your answer.



Best regards, Jerald A DeLong, KD4YAL

Re: GPL source code

Jerald A DeLong <kd4yal@...>
 

Bryan,

Thank you for the information.


Would you foresee Amateur Community participation in future firmware releases?




Jerry, KD4YAL 

3rd Party Development for the UDR56K (Was: GPL source code)

"John D. Hays" <john@...>
 

As Bryan stated, we will not be delivering any kernel patch or driver source code before product release.  This code is under active development and test, and is often the case in such development it may make significant changes before the product is released.  It would be a disservice to external developers, who do not participate in our internal development process, to provide code that may send them down a path that could suddenly take an unexpected turn.

At some point, the code base will be placed in a public repository (like SourceForge) where others can not only retrieve it but get updates as they are released.

We are aware that there is always a desire when something new is coming out to get a jump on a 'cool' project that has been waiting for the product.  However, as a company we need to stay focused on getting the product ready for market.  The good news is things are progressing nicely and we will give updates over the next weeks and months as we get closer to release.

Our thinking is that we will have several communities of users for the product:

1. Application users.  These are customers who want a specific application such as a D-STAR radio for DD or DV, an APRS terminal, an AMPRNET node, etc. and are looking for pre-built applications with easy configuration and operation, that are basically plug and play. For these users we need a very well defined offering that we are confident will be usable and reliable.   These users' need for source code is generally non-existent other than for the assurance the code is available in both binary and source form.

2. Infrastructure builders.  These are customers who likewise need "plug and play" solutions whether that be a RMS Gateway, APRS iGate, D-STAR Gateway, AMPRNET Gateway, or similar. Again source code is for understanding how it works and the assurance that it is there for a rebuild or modification, if needed.  These folks also need integration information on how to connect their piece of infrastructure into other infrastructure.  They need application notes, recipes, and examples, e.g. how do I use the UDR56K to support my current 1200 baud, 2 meter, APRS node and extend it cover higher speeds at 70cm?  How do I build a large, regional packet network backbone? How do I add a UDR56K to my existing D-STAR stack?  How can I make a regional Digital Voice network with many access points and repeaters that are bound together to create one large "virtual repeater"?

3. Visionaries, Experimenters, Accessory Builders, and Application writers.  These are the folks that really need access to source code, because they may need to add a driver, write a new protocol handler, create a new way to integrate additional technology.  There needs to be a reliable source of code, documentation, and examples for them to adopt, modify, and understand.  This is probably the smallest group, and potentially the inventors of better ways to accomplish what the application user and infrastructure builder is trying to achieve. Where NW Digital Radio is different, is we want to enable these folks, for the advancement of the art of Amateur Radio.  Most companies don't want you modifying their "competitive advantage" and "proprietary secrets" -- most of what will make our product work from day one is built using or building upon the work of others who have shared their talents through open source.  Our goal is to extend that wonderful gift back to the community and hopefully the community will reward us for it, by buying our products and enabling others.

The question has been raised if 3rd parties will have the opportunity participate in the creation of these components?  The answer to that is an enthusiastic "Yes!" We just ask that you allow us to bring our product(s) to a deliverable state and to roll out the enabling tools when the time is right.

There is very little "firmware" in the sense of a traditional embedded device, most things run under the OS, either as applications or as components in the drivers for hardware.  There may be some low level "bit twiddling" that is closer to traditional firmware and we can talk about that when someone has a specific need.

We will review 3rd party components for "fit" in our standard delivery and add them if it makes sense.  Individuals are always welcome to take advantage of the open platform for their own components.

One of the perils of our approach is that support of the product(s) we produce grows with open access, and can be costly unless we limit our direct efforts. (Such costs would need to be reflected in product price or performed for a fee, neither of which is appealing.)  We are going to have to some guiding principles.

1. If we build and deliver it, including unmodified binary code, we have an obligation to support it.

2. There will be many applications added to the built-in computer by customers and users.  We won't help you port or debug applications that have no direct bearing on the product's primary purpose and we reserve the right to say "that application is outside of our interest."  E.g. if you install an application or widget that is not from us, you should expect to get support from whomever you obtained it. 

3. If you (re-)compile it, substitute components, or add your own hardware and break it, you get to fix it.  We aren't going to protect you from yourself and aren't obligated to rescue you.

4. If you are developing some super new application, porting some useful application, or building a new add-on and we decide its "going to add enough value to justify the work" we will consult with you as time permits. (Extremely limited right now.)

5. There may be some things in the kernel patches and drivers that don't make sense.  We likely won't tell you why we did it that way, and if you change it, you might break it (see principle number 3). The reality of using some advanced/modern components is that there may be "quirks" that we have to work around and some "upstream" vendors are very picky about what we say.  We are committed to openness, customer support, and sharing -- we are not committed to being sued. 

6. This forum is a good place to support one another and we do read it.

With all of that said, we know some of you are still eager to start working on something... :)

Here's what I will offer for now.  Not much you can do today that interfaces directly with the radio board, but if you have applications that run on the computer side, that only talk to peripherals (and kernel AX.25) and want to give it a go:

Pick an ARM based board to test/run your application.  We did some early development using the Sheeva Plug (our processor is 800 Mhz and ARMv5).  I'll be receiving a Raspberry Pi tomorrow and out of curiosity will test some of my compiled applications, e.g. ircDDBGateway on it.

We are using Debian/Squeeze (kernel 3.2.5 from http://kernel.org at the present time) based distribution.  So far, standard ARMEL versions of packages (apt-get / .deb) seem to load and run.  You can load and run a native compiler / linker  or use a cross compile chain of your choice, we are using a recent version from Mentor Graphics for kernel work. (They have downloadable versions.)  I use a 32bit Debian Squeeze on AMD64 in a virtual machine for development and copy to the ARM board, it's much faster using multiple processors and lots of memory for compile and link.

So have fun and we at NW Digital Radio will keep "heads down" on getting the product to market.



John D. Hays
K7VE
PO Box 1223, Edmonds, WA 98020-1223 
  

Raspberry Pi D-STAR Gateway

"John D. Hays" <john@...>
 

I've been working on a port of Jonathan's gateway and pcrepeatercontroller software to the ARM processor for the coming UDR56K (http://nwdigitalradio.com) digital radio.  It has been running for a couple of months on KF7UFZ gateway (currently B).

I received my $35 Raspberry Pi (http://www.raspberrypi.org) Linux computer yesterday and this evening I had a few minutes after work and copied my port and configuration files over to the Raspberry Pi.  I am successfully testing ircDDBGateway with GMSKRepeater (NQMHS board/DUTCH*Star beta firmware).  I connected to REF001C to get some traffic and successfully made contacts with 3-4 stations.

I don't happen to have an Icom RP2C here at the shack to test, but Jonathan's ircDDBGateway does support it as a controller.

root@raspberrypi:~# cat /proc/cpuinfo
Processor       : ARMv6-compatible processor rev 7 (v6l)
BogoMIPS        : 697.95   (The UDR56K processor shows 1064.96 BogoMIPS)
Features        : swp half thumb fastmult vfp edsp java tls
CPU implementer : 0x41
CPU architecture: 7
CPU variant     : 0x0
CPU part        : 0xb76
CPU revision    : 7

Hardware        : BCM2708
Revision        : 0002
Serial          : 0000000099172048

top - 18:23:37 up 48 min,  2 users,  load average: 0.00, 0.02, 0.11
Tasks:  58 total,   1 running,  57 sleeping,   0 stopped,   0 zombie
Cpu(s):  1.3%us,  3.0%sy,  0.0%ni, 95.7%id,  0.0%wa,  0.0%hi,  0.0%si,  0.0%st
Mem:    190836k total,   180472k used,    10364k free,     6084k buffers
Swap:        0k total,        0k used,        0k free,   149508k cached

  PID USER      PR  NI  VIRT  RES  SHR S %CPU %MEM    TIME+  COMMAND
 1102 root      20   0 82812 4608 2444 S  2.3  2.4   1:04.42 ircddbgatewayd
 1187 root      20   0 40624 3008 2028 S  1.0  1.6   1:11.46 gmskrepeaterd
 1253 root      20   0  2608 1152  936 R  1.0  0.6   0:00.09 top
  491 root      20   0  1712  504  424 S  0.3  0.3   0:01.41 ifplugd
    1 root      20   0  2076  700  608 S  0.0  0.4   0:00.69 init

CPU utilization when keyed up is ircDDBGateway 9+%  GMSKRepeater 4+%

Operating System is Debian Squeeze (both platforms), for the Raspberry Pi I needed to install portaudio19-dev

My Pi is housed in this box http://www.adafruit.com/products/859 and I'm powering it with http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004911E9M 


John D. Hays
K7VE
PO Box 1223, Edmonds, WA 98020-1223 
  

Re: Raspberry Pi D-STAR Gateway

Dennis Rogers <n5vrp.satx@...>
 

Where did you purchase the RaspberryPi in the USA?
Can you send me a link to the ordering site?

Thanks!

Dennis


On Tue, Jun 12, 2012 at 8:42 PM, John D. Hays <john@...> wrote:
 

I've been working on a port of Jonathan's gateway and pcrepeatercontroller software to the ARM processor for the coming UDR56K (http://nwdigitalradio.com) digital radio.  It has been running for a couple of months on KF7UFZ gateway (currently B).

I received my $35 Raspberry Pi (http://www.raspberrypi.org) Linux computer yesterday and this evening I had a few minutes after work and copied my port and configuration files over to the Raspberry Pi.  I am successfully testing ircDDBGateway with GMSKRepeater (NQMHS board/DUTCH*Star beta firmware).  I connected to REF001C to get some traffic and successfully made contacts with 3-4 stations.

I don't happen to have an Icom RP2C here at the shack to test, but Jonathan's ircDDBGateway does support it as a controller.

root@raspberrypi:~# cat /proc/cpuinfo
Processor       : ARMv6-compatible processor rev 7 (v6l)
BogoMIPS        : 697.95   (The UDR56K processor shows 1064.96 BogoMIPS)
Features        : swp half thumb fastmult vfp edsp java tls
CPU implementer : 0x41
CPU architecture: 7
CPU variant     : 0x0
CPU part        : 0xb76
CPU revision    : 7

Hardware        : BCM2708
Revision        : 0002
Serial          : 0000000099172048

top - 18:23:37 up 48 min,  2 users,  load average: 0.00, 0.02, 0.11
Tasks:  58 total,   1 running,  57 sleeping,   0 stopped,   0 zombie
Cpu(s):  1.3%us,  3.0%sy,  0.0%ni, 95.7%id,  0.0%wa,  0.0%hi,  0.0%si,  0.0%st
Mem:    190836k total,   180472k used,    10364k free,     6084k buffers
Swap:        0k total,        0k used,        0k free,   149508k cached

  PID USER      PR  NI  VIRT  RES  SHR S %CPU %MEM    TIME+  COMMAND
 1102 root      20   0 82812 4608 2444 S  2.3  2.4   1:04.42 ircddbgatewayd
 1187 root      20   0 40624 3008 2028 S  1.0  1.6   1:11.46 gmskrepeaterd
 1253 root      20   0  2608 1152  936 R  1.0  0.6   0:00.09 top
  491 root      20   0  1712  504  424 S  0.3  0.3   0:01.41 ifplugd
    1 root      20   0  2076  700  608 S  0.0  0.4   0:00.69 init

CPU utilization when keyed up is ircDDBGateway 9+%  GMSKRepeater 4+%

Operating System is Debian Squeeze (both platforms), for the Raspberry Pi I needed to install portaudio19-dev

My Pi is housed in this box http://www.adafruit.com/products/859 and I'm powering it with http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004911E9M 


John D. Hays
K7VE
PO Box 1223, Edmonds, WA 98020-1223 
  




--

Dennis, N5VRP
n5vrp.satx@...


Re: Raspberry Pi D-STAR Gateway

"Trevor ." <m5aka@...>
 

--- On Wed, 13/6/12, Dennis Rogers <n5vrp.satx@...> wrote:
Can you send me a link to the ordering site?
You can buy the Raspberry Pi through

Premier Farnell/Element 14
http://www.farnell.com/

and RS Components.
http://rswww.com/

Both distributors sell all over the world.

73 Trevor M5AKA

Re: Raspberry Pi D-STAR Gateway

Bruce Given <bruce.given@...>
 

There is a LARGE waiting list from what I can gather
the other board that you might want to look at is from VIA
url is here http://apc.io/

they are starting to ship in July, it comes with Android , But it
should not be too difficult to get
debian or something similar up and running on it.

I have ordered a couple and want to try them for various Ham radio
digital projects
including pairing with UDR56K

regards
Bruce
VE2GZI

--
I’d rather live in a world full of eccentric thinkers than one full of
unthinking consumers.

Re: Raspberry Pi D-STAR Gateway

Sander Pool <sander_pool@...>
 

Excellent work! I'm really excited about these tiny linux computers and what they can do for embedded projects of all kinds of flavors. I recently built a focuser controller for my telescope using an Arduino and that wasn't very hard but having a full linux environment with screen, keyboard, debugger etc. for the same price (about) is amazing.

73,

Sander W1SOP

Re: Raspberry Pi D-STAR Gateway

"John D. Hays" <john@...>
 

Hi Bruce,

Yes there is a big waiting list, I got myself on the list within the first day or two of the announced availability and just received mine.

The APC computer is indeed interesting, but since they are not yet available it's hard to say if a Debian install will be easy.  I'll leave that to others.

There are a few other options like the Sheeva Plug, Beagleboard, etc.  The gateway code is pretty distribution agnostic, but most folks run it on Debian or Red Hat derivitives.   So if you have a "beefy" enough ARM processor and a Linux OS, it can probably be made to work.

Since the UDR56K already has the processor board, no external board will be required.  It will not only be able to run the gateway and half-duplex access (hotspot) through it's own radio, but I'm fairly confident that you could run a couple of USB connected node adapters and build a mini-stack.  Since ircDDBGateway also talks to Icom's RP2C, you might be able to integrate the UDR56K to add say 56K DD and let it also run the RP2C, eliminating the need for a separate computer.

One repeater configuration may be to use an external receiver with a node adapter and dvrptr board (I would probably not use the soundcard solution) combined with splitrepeater to build a full repeater with the UDR56K.


John D. Hays
K7VE
PO Box 1223, Edmonds, WA 98020-1223 
  



On Wed, Jun 13, 2012 at 5:49 AM, Bruce Given <bruce.given@...> wrote:
There is a LARGE waiting list from what I can gather
the other board that you might want to look at is from VIA
url is here http://apc.io/

they are starting to ship in July, it comes with Android , But it
should not be too difficult to get
debian or something similar up and running on it.

I have ordered a couple and want to try them for various Ham radio
digital projects
including pairing with UDR56K

regards
Bruce
VE2GZI

Re: Raspberry Pi D-STAR Gateway

"William Stillwell - KI4SWY" <wkstill@...>
 

Makes me what to try on my friendlyarm boards which are way faster then rasberypi.

 

Raspberry pi is great for graphics as it has a very good video processor.

 

From: UniversalDigitalRadio@... [mailto:UniversalDigitalRadio@...] On Behalf Of John D. Hays
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2012 12:17 PM
To: UniversalDigitalRadio@...
Subject: Re: [UniversalDigitalRadio] Raspberry Pi D-STAR Gateway

 

 

Hi Bruce,

 

Yes there is a big waiting list, I got myself on the list within the first day or two of the announced availability and just received mine.

 

The APC computer is indeed interesting, but since they are not yet available it's hard to say if a Debian install will be easy.  I'll leave that to others.

 

There are a few other options like the Sheeva Plug, Beagleboard, etc.  The gateway code is pretty distribution agnostic, but most folks run it on Debian or Red Hat derivitives.   So if you have a "beefy" enough ARM processor and a Linux OS, it can probably be made to work.

 

Since the UDR56K already has the processor board, no external board will be required.  It will not only be able to run the gateway and half-duplex access (hotspot) through it's own radio, but I'm fairly confident that you could run a couple of USB connected node adapters and build a mini-stack.  Since ircDDBGateway also talks to Icom's RP2C, you might be able to integrate the UDR56K to add say 56K DD and let it also run the RP2C, eliminating the need for a separate computer.

 

One repeater configuration may be to use an external receiver with a node adapter and dvrptr board (I would probably not use the soundcard solution) combined with splitrepeater to build a full repeater with the UDR56K.


John D. Hays
K7VE

PO Box 1223, Edmonds, WA 98020-1223 

  



On Wed, Jun 13, 2012 at 5:49 AM, Bruce Given <bruce.given@...> wrote:

There is a LARGE waiting list from what I can gather
the other board that you might want to look at is from VIA
url is here http://apc.io/

they are starting to ship in July, it comes with Android , But it
should not be too difficult to get
debian or something similar up and running on it.

I have ordered a couple and want to try them for various Ham radio
digital projects
including pairing with UDR56K

regards
Bruce
VE2GZI

Re: Raspberry Pi D-STAR Gateway

Kristoff Bonne <kristoff@...>
 

Hi William,


I also have a friendlyarm.


What distro are you running on yours?

When using its linux native distro, I managed to get ALSA to work (which I need for my tests with gmsk modem), but getting anything else ported to it gives me all kind of issues).

I also tried angrom linux which does have a lot of packages ported, but I couldn't get ALSA to work on it correctly.


73
Kristoff - ON1ARF


On 13-06-12 18:25, William Stillwell - KI4SWY wrote:
 

Makes me what to try on my friendlyarm boards which are way faster then rasberypi.

 

Raspberry pi is great for graphics as it has a very good video processor.

 

From: UniversalDigitalRadio@... [mailto:UniversalDigitalRadio@...] On Behalf Of John D. Hays
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2012 12:17 PM
To: UniversalDigitalRadio@...
Subject: Re: [Univer salDigitalRadio] Raspberry Pi D-STAR Gateway

 

 

Hi Bruce,

 

Yes there is a big waiting list, I got myself on the list within the first day or two of the announced availability and just received mine.

 

The APC computer is indeed interesting, but since they are not yet available it's hard to say if a Debian install will be easy.  I'll leave that to others.

 

There are a few other options like the Sheeva Plug, Beagleboard, etc.  The gateway code is pretty distribution agnostic, but most folks run it on Debian or Red Hat derivitives.   So if you have a "beefy" enough ARM processor and a Linux OS, it can probably be made to work.

 

Since the UDR56K already has the processor board, no external board will be required.  It will not only be able to run the gateway and half-duplex access (hotspot) through it's own radio, but I'm fairly confident that you could run a couple of USB connected node adapters and build a mini-stack.  Since ircDDBGateway also talks to Icom's RP2C, you might be able to integrate the UDR56K to add say 56K DD and let it also run the RP2C, eliminating the need for a separate computer.

 

One repeater configuration may be to use an external receiver with a node adapter and dvrptr board (I would probably not use the soundcard solution) combined with splitrepeater to build a full repeater with the UDR5 6K.


John D. Hays
K7VE

PO Box 1223, Edmonds, WA 98020-1223 

  



On Wed, Jun 13, 2012 at 5:49 AM, Bruce Given <bruce.given@...> wrote:

There is a LARGE waiting list from what I can gather
the other board that you might want to look at is from VIA
url is here http://apc.io/

they are starting to ship in July, it comes with Android , But it
should not be too difficult to get
debian or something similar up and running on it.

I have ordered a couple and want to try them for various Ham radio
digital projects
including pairing with UDR56K

regards
Bruce
VE2GZI



Re: Raspberry Pi D-STAR Gateway

"William Stillwell - KI4SWY" <wkstill@...>
 

Still the stock firmware L



I got to many projects going on.







From: Kristoff Bonne [mailto:kristoff@...]
Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2012 12:49 PM
To: UniversalDigitalRadio@...
Cc: William Stillwell - KI4SWY
Subject: Re: [UniversalDigitalRadio] Raspberry Pi D-STAR Gateway



Hi William,


I also have a friendlyarm.


What distro are you running on yours?

When using its linux native distro, I managed to get ALSA to work (which I need for my tests with gmsk modem), but getting anything else ported to it gives me all kind of issues).

I also tried angrom linux which does have a lot of packages ported, but I couldn't get ALSA to work on it correctly.


73
Kristoff - ON1ARF

Re: Raspberry Pi D-STAR Gateway

Kristoff Bonne <kristoff@...>
 

Hi John,



On 13-06-12 03:42, John D. Hays wrote:
 
I've been working on a port of Jonathan's gateway and pcrepeatercontroller software to the ARM processor for the coming UDR56K (http://nwdigitalradio.com) digital radio.  It has been running for a couple of months on KF7UFZ gateway (currently B).

I received my $35 Raspberry Pi (http://www.raspberrypi.org) Linux computer yesterday and this evening I had a few minutes after work and copied my port and configuration files over to the Raspberry Pi.  I am successfully testing ircDDBGateway with GMSKRepeater (NQMHS board/DUTCH*Star beta firmware).  I connected to REF001C to get some traffic and successfully made contacts with 3-4 stations.

I don't happen to have an Icom RP2C here at the shack to test, but Jonathan's ircDDBGateway does support it as a controller.

root@raspberrypi:~# cat /proc/cpuinfo
Processor       : ARMv6-compatible processor rev 7 (v6l)

Wouldn't it be interesting to make up a lost on what ARM hardware or other platforms this software runs.


The raspi is now proven.
I have a pandaboard running ubuntu on which I can test this. There is also the beaglebone. I think Jonathan also mentioned the hawkboard (I don't know if he actually did run it on that board).

I really like something like the beaglebone as it has a smaller formfactor that the beagleboard or pandaboard, does have USB and ethernet, it runs a off-the-shelf distro and also allows for hardware extensions using the GPIO port and the serial port if you want to interface it with -say- an arduino based platform. (say something to interface it with a weather station, or get it to play out messages when the voltage of the battery goes low).


73
Kristoff - ON1ARF


Re: Raspberry Pi D-STAR Gateway

"John D. Hays" <john@...>
 

A few common questions and answers.

Q. Who has Raspberry Pi in stock?
A. Nobody.  Sorry, I don't have a shortcut.  You have to put your name on the supplier's list and wait.  I put my name on the list right after the announcement.

Q. I see you are using an iPhone power module, how does it connect to the Raspberry Pi?
A. The aftermarket iPhone power module "cube" converts AC (mains) to 5V on a standard USB port. The Raspberry Pi is looking for a micro USB connection for power.  I happened to have a cable for my Kindle handy, just get something similar to  http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004911E9M -- the nice thing about the USB connector is there are cigarette lighter adapters that do the same thing if you want to take it mobile.

Q. You said you made a few contacts, how did you get the AMBE chip connected?
A. The Raspberry Pi is connected to the Internet via a LAN and is running the ircDDBGateway and  GMSKRepeater daemons.  I have a node adapter plugged into a USB hub which in turn is plugged into the Pi, this handles the transition to and from a radio (Yaesu  FT-817 in this case, I will probably test against my Kenwood repeater and dvrrptr board soon). The radio acts as the RF gateway for D-STAR and I use D-STAR radios which contain the AMBE chip to talk to the radio as if it was a D-STAR repeater or "hotspot".   I used both the ID-31AD and IC-91AD on a simplex frequency in the 70cm band.  The contacts were made using DPLUS linking to REF001C, since there are usually stations monitoring there, reports were excellent from each station.

Q. Since I'll have to wait for a Raspberry Pi are there alternatives?
A. G4KLX's software such as ircDDBGateway and the various repeater controllers are pretty agnostic when it comes to Linux distribution, most installs are on either Red Hat or Debian derivatives. They are well proven on x86 platforms.  I was not the first to put them on an ARM processor and if you are using an EABI Armel build, it should run on a variety of ARM platforms such as Sheeva Plug, Beaglebone, etc. the main considerations are interfaces (USB and Ethernet) and processor performance / memory.  You don't get the full 256MB of RAM on the Pi, but it seems to be fine, the footprint is pretty small but I wouldn't recommend going with less memory or fewer MIPS.  On the Pi, I am not running the GUI, though it is available, it puts more demand on the processor, and I'm content with a command line. (Been doing Linux/Unix command line for 30 years.)

Q. So how do I get G4KLX's code running?
A. You can download source from the ircDDBGateway and pcrepeatercontroller Yahoo! forums and either do a native build on the Pi or cross-compile.  

I choose to cross-compile using a VM running Debian Squeeze on 2 cores of an AMD processor running 2.9 Ghz. each, with 8 GB of allocated RAM. This is considerably faster than native compilation and then I simply copy the files over to the Pi via the LAN.  I used the Emdebian toolchain for this cross-compile build and got native libs using xapt.

You will need to install development packages and libraries for wxgtk2.8 to build the gateway, plus portaudio19-dev and possibly libusb-1.0 to build the repeatercontroller.  There are also changes that need to be made to the makefile to use the tool chain and to find the libraries and include files.  

Q. That's beyond my skill or seems like a lot of work, are there binaries that can just be installed?
A. Yes and No.  If someone has built binaries you might get them to send them to you.  A tar of all of the binaries in the gateway package and the pcrepeatercontroller package total roughly 100MB without compression.

The right way to do this is to build a .deb install package.  It doesn't look hard, but I haven't done it before and it would be really good to have someone that knows what they are doing create and maintain such a package (including updates).  I could provide the needed information if there's a volunteer?  (crickets chirping in the background)

If there were such a package, binary installs would take the form of:

aptitude install ircDDBGateway 
aptitude install Repeater

Q. So you are building a radio that will incorporate this functionality on its own ARM processor, why are you showing us how to do this on a $35 computer?
A. I and my company are able to build this radio platform, in a large part, because talented people have shared so much in the form of Open Source. It's important to contribute back to the community to see what other great innovations can grow from it.  We see a great demand for the UDR56K and think that its a good value, so we hope lots of folks agree and will buy our radio for these types of applications in a nice integrated system -- time will tell.


John D. Hays
K7VE
PO Box 1223, Edmonds, WA 98020-1223 
  




Re: Raspberry Pi D-STAR Gateway

Kristoff Bonne <kristoff@...>
 

Hi,



On 13-06-12 21:14, John D. Hays wrote:
  Q. Since I'll have to wait for a Raspberry Pi are there alternatives?
A. G4KLX's software such as ircDDBGateway and the various repeater controllers are pretty agnostic when it comes to Linux distribution, most installs are on either Red Hat or Debian derivatives. They are well proven on x86 platforms.  I was not the first to put them on an ARM processor and if you are using an EABI Armel build, it should run on a variety of ARM platforms such as Sheeva Plug, Beaglebone, etc. the main considerations are interfaces (USB and Ethernet) and processor performance / memory.  You don't get the full 256MB of RAM on the Pi, but it seems to be fine, the footprint is pretty small but I wouldn't recommend going with less memory or fewer MIPS.  On the Pi, I am not running the GUI, though it is available, it puts more demand on the processor, and I'm content with a command line. (Been doing Linux/Unix command line for 30 years.)

I did a quick test yesterday. The pcrepeater code compiles out of the box on a pandaboard running ubuntu.
(Concidering Jonathan's track record, I didn't expect anything else. :-) )


However, the pandaboard (and beagleboard) might be quite overkill for this. Concidering its dualcore cortex ARM A9 and a additional DSP core, this is more the kind of device to use in a video or ATV enviroment. (unless you plan to run 8 D-STAR repeaters simultanous with a 100 Khz bandwidth radio :-) )




Q. That's beyond my skill or seems like a lot of work, are there binaries that can just be installed?
A. Yes and No.  If someone has built binaries you might get them to send them to you.  A tar of all of the binaries in the gateway package and the pcrepeatercontroller package total roughly 100MB without compression.

The right way to do this is to build a .deb install package.  It doesn't look hard, but I haven't done it before and it would be really good to have someone that knows what they are doing create and maintain such a package (including updates).  I could provide the needed information if there's a volunteer?  (crickets chirping in the background)

If there were such a package, binary installs would take the form of:

aptitude install ircDDBGateway 
aptitude install Repeater
Hmm. I haven't done this neither but I can give it a try for the pandaboard/ubuntu.

If it works, we can look at automating this.



John D. Hays
K7VE
73
Kristoff - ON1ARF

Update ?!

"bruce.given" <bruce.given@...>
 

Hi Guys,
group has been quiet for a bit , John any updates or are the developers just busy developing away ?!....

Just wanted to see how things are going

regards
Bruce
VE2GZI

Re: Update ?!

"John D. Hays" <john@...>
 

Hi Bruce,

We have a lot of parallel work going on right now.  

In hardware engineering we're working through some updates for the next run of alpha/beta boards. These updates are aimed at making the UDR56K-4 one solid platform, whether for plug and play deployment or for development and experimentation.

On the software and application side we are focusing on first deliverables for AX.25 and D-STAR.  We have an ever increasing number of use cases and associated applications to consider.  As we get closer to delivery we will provide a series of application notes to help integrators and experimenters to explore, prepare, and deliver solutions.

Some of the topics we will provide notes for include:
  • Bridging AX.25, D-STAR, and other data services through the UDR, including IP networking, position reporting, and messaging.
  • Using an external TNC and radio attached via USB serial to the UDR to provide dual-band, multi-speed AX.25/APRS applications
  • Using an external Node Adapter and radio attached to the UDR to provide a two "module" D-STAR gateway.
  • Using a cluster of UDRs to extend coverage for D-STAR and/or data networks.
  • ...

So if you aren't seeing a lot from NW Digital Radio on the list(s), its mainly that we're "head's down" getting the UDR56K-4 prepared for distribution.

Thank you for pinging us, and as always everyone is welcome to post their questions and ideas to this list.  I will try to respond in a timely manner.

We hope everyone is having a great summer.


John D. Hays
K7VE
PO Box 1223, Edmonds, WA 98020-1223 
  



On Tue, Jul 10, 2012 at 3:39 AM, bruce.given <bruce.given@...> wrote:
 

Hi Guys,
group has been quiet for a bit , John any updates or are the developers just busy developing away ?!....

Just wanted to see how things are going

regards
Bruce
VE2GZI