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Heard on the street

Steve <stevewa206@...>
 

Hi all,
I was with a small group of hams this weekend talking about the radio. One of them mentioned that he was not interested in the radio because he did not know Linux. I think there might be some marketing issues here. I do believe that there will be web pages for set up ans applications so a user does not have to use the Linux command line? Or is that later? 

Tons of non Linux users out there.

Steve N0FPF

"John" <john@...>
 

A user would normally access radio functions either via a Web Browser or custom application running on their own computer under its operating system.

Many devices people use every day run a form of Linux and the user never knows. IOS on the iPhone/iPad are based on a Mach kernel (like Linux) and Android is a Linux based OS. Most home Internet routers are also Linux based.

If one is going to write new protocols or applications, then they will probably need some level of Linux knowledge, though one could cross compile and file copy for some applications.

--- In UniversalDigitalRadio@..., Steve <stevewa206@...> wrote:

Hi all,
I was with a small group of hams this weekend talking about the radio. One
of them mentioned that he was not interested in the radio because he did
not know Linux.

Mickey Baker <fishflorida@...>
 

Several years ago, I was working as a CTO of a government organization. We were low on funds to purchase public access PCs that we put in the libraries for people to use, but had a room full of discarded desktop computers from a recent replacement project. We had no extra seats of Microsoft products for these computers.

We put a flavor of Linux and OpenOffice on those PCs, deployed them to 4 different libraries and had zero complaints.

After a bit of tweaking, Linux looked so much like Windoze that the casual user didn't notice a serious difference. Five years later, that practice is still in use - when used desktop PC's are replaced, they go to the libraries and to the jail for use, running Linux, costing the local government nothing. 

There is nothing to worry about. Linux is generally more stable that Windows XP and at least as easy to use. This is nothing to fret about.

73,

Mickey N4MB



On Mon, May 21, 2012 at 11:55 PM, Steve <stevewa206@...> wrote:
 

Hi all,

I was with a small group of hams this weekend talking about the radio. One of them mentioned that he was not interested in the radio because he did not know Linux. I think there might be some marketing issues here. I do believe that there will be web pages for set up ans applications so a user does not have to use the Linux command line? Or is that later? 

Tons of non Linux users out there.

Steve N0FPF




--
Mickey Baker, N4MB
Fort Lauderdale, FL
“Tell me, and I will listen. Show me, and I will understand. Involve me, and I will learn.” Teton Lakota, American Indian Saying.

steve <stevewa206@...>
 

I think that needs to be clear on your PDF's etc.... in my opinion!

Steve

On 5/21/2012 9:03 PM, John wrote:

A user would normally access radio functions either via a Web Browser or custom application running on their own computer under its operating system.

Many devices people use every day run a form of Linux and the user never knows. IOS on the iPhone/iPad are based on a Mach kernel (like Linux) and Android is a Linux based OS. Most home Internet routers are also Linux based.

If one is going to write new protocols or applications, then they will probably need some level of Linux knowledge, though one could cross compile and file copy for some applications.

--- In UniversalDigitalRadio@... <mailto:UniversalDigitalRadio%40yahoogroups.com>, Steve <stevewa206@...> wrote:

Hi all,
I was with a small group of hams this weekend talking about the
radio. One
of them mentioned that he was not interested in the radio because he did
not know Linux.

Tyrell Berry <kd7kuj@...>
 

I read a phrase of nearly exactly that wording in several places on the website...  If people are unwilling to research a product before purchasing it, maybe the product in question isn't right for them.  Just MY opinion.

On May 21, 2012 10:33 PM, "steve" <stevewa206@...> wrote:
I think that needs to be clear on your PDF's etc.... in my opinion!

Steve

On 5/21/2012 9:03 PM, John wrote:
>
> A user would normally access radio functions either via a Web Browser
> or custom application running on their own computer under its
> operating system.
>
> Many devices people use every day run a form of Linux and the user
> never knows. IOS on the iPhone/iPad are based on a Mach kernel (like
> Linux) and Android is a Linux based OS. Most home Internet routers are
> also Linux based.
>
> If one is going to write new protocols or applications, then they will
> probably need some level of Linux knowledge, though one could cross
> compile and file copy for some applications.
>
> --- In UniversalDigitalRadio@...
> UniversalDigitalRadio%40yahoogroups.com>, Steve
> wrote:
> >
> > Hi all,
> > I was with a small group of hams this weekend talking about the
> radio. One
> > of them mentioned that he was not interested in the radio because he did
> > not know Linux.
>
>


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"Chris B" <brizey02@...>
 

I think the Linux OS is a great platform for development, if it had a Windows OS, I'm sure the price would be very high and limit developers somewhat.

--- In UniversalDigitalRadio@..., "John" <john@...> wrote:

A user would normally access radio functions either via a Web Browser or custom application running on their own computer under its operating system.

Many devices people use every day run a form of Linux and the user never knows. IOS on the iPhone/iPad are based on a Mach kernel (like Linux) and Android is a Linux based OS. Most home Internet routers are also Linux based.

If one is going to write new protocols or applications, then they will probably need some level of Linux knowledge, though one could cross compile and file copy for some applications.

--- In UniversalDigitalRadio@..., Steve <stevewa206@> wrote:

Hi all,
I was with a small group of hams this weekend talking about the radio. One
of them mentioned that he was not interested in the radio because he did
not know Linux.

Tyrell Berry <kd7kuj@...>
 

Not just as a development environment; The stability of Linux makes it ideal for consumer grade products as well, which is why so many consumer grade products (like phones and TVs and routers and firewalls and... etc) use  it. 

On May 22, 2012 9:06 AM, "Chris B" <brizey02@...> wrote:
 

I think the Linux OS is a great platform for development, if it had a Windows OS, I'm sure the price would be very high and limit developers somewhat.

--- In UniversalDigitalRadio@..., "John" wrote:
>
> A user would normally access radio functions either via a Web Browser or custom application running on their own computer under its operating system.
>
> Many devices people use every day run a form of Linux and the user never knows. IOS on the iPhone/iPad are based on a Mach kernel (like Linux) and Android is a Linux based OS. Most home Internet routers are also Linux based.
>
> If one is going to write new protocols or applications, then they will probably need some level of Linux knowledge, though one could cross compile and file copy for some applications.
>
> --- In UniversalDigitalRadio@..., Steve wrote:
> >
> > Hi all,
> > I was with a small group of hams this weekend talking about the radio. One
> > of them mentioned that he was not interested in the radio because he did
> > not know Linux.
>

"qrv@..." <qrv@...>
 

tizen.org is a fascinating project, joined by some
big players like Samsung, to foster development of
Linux across a wide spectrum of applications and
devices.

A project like that reinforces the growing presence
of Linux as a major player in the world of technology
at every level.

Apple, Linux, and Microsoft all use a "windows" type
of gui - there is nothing whatsoever unique about the
MS implementation.

One neat new development is the kinect-type in-the-air
interface where hand-gestures replace a physical mouse.

Voice interfaces have finally crossed a threshold of
accuracy where they also alter the way that we control
devices. Accessibility for handicapped users and mobile
ops are obvious apps.

Exciting times!


--

Thanks! & 73, KD4E.com

David Colburn - Nevils, Georgia USA

Android for Hams: groups.yahoo.com/group/hamdroid

Restored to design-spec at Heaven's gate 1Cor15:22

Nate Bargmann <n0nb@...>
 

* On 2012 22 May 13:49 -0500, qrv@... wrote:
Apple, Linux, and Microsoft all use a "windows" type
of gui - there is nothing whatsoever unique about the
MS implementation.
Except that people are familiar with MS Windows' bugs and warts and when
shown a Linux desktop and hear, "Just like Windows", the assumption is
that they will be using a bug-for-bug/wart-for-wart free replacement.
Such is not the case. Proper advocacy should avoid comparisions, of
which I am guilty.

People that claim Linux is too hard to use have either heard that from
some (to them) reputable source, or had to conjur up X mode lines long
ago. ;-) These days I find the automatic detection of most any piece
of hardware I've thrown at my current Linux systems make life much
easier than it must be for those using said devices on MS Windows where
the insrtuctions vary from plug/attach device to install driver software
first.

One neat new development is the kinect-type in-the-air
interface where hand-gestures replace a physical mouse.

Voice interfaces have finally crossed a threshold of
accuracy where they also alter the way that we control
devices. Accessibility for handicapped users and mobile
ops are obvious apps.
Ummmm, given the mood I can find myself in at times, the software had
better filter out certain gestures and words from its action command
list!

Exciting times!
Indeed. This project instantly piqued my interest.

73, de Nate >>

--

"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all
possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true."

Ham radio, Linux, bikes, and more: http://www.n0nb.us

"qrv@..." <qrv@...>
 

Those who have gone through the last 3 iterations of MS versions
of windows can now easily be told (and understand) that "Adjusting
to Linux is just like adjusting to Vista after you were used to XP."

The difference is no more radical than that - unless one chooses
to go with amore experimental distro.

It's exciting to see more Ham apps and gear moving to Linux.

Nate Bargmann wrote:
* On 2012 22 May 13:49 -0500, qrv@... wrote:
Apple, Linux, and Microsoft all use a "windows" type
of gui - there is nothing whatsoever unique about the
MS implementation.
Except that people are familiar with MS Windows' bugs and warts and when
shown a Linux desktop and hear, "Just like Windows", the assumption is
that they will be using a bug-for-bug/wart-for-wart free replacement.
Such is not the case. Proper advocacy should avoid comparisions, of
which I am guilty.
--

Thanks! & 73, KD4E.com

David Colburn - Nevils, Georgia USA

Android for Hams: groups.yahoo.com/group/hamdroid

Restored to design-spec at Heaven's gate 1Cor15:22

"Tony Langdon, VK3JED" <vk3jed@...>
 

At 03:55 AM 5/23/2012, you wrote:


Not just as a development environment; The stability of Linux makes it ideal for consumer grade products as well, which is why so many consumer grade products (like phones and TVs and routers and firewalls and... etc) use it.
Unless you're in the know, you'd be surprised where Linux pops up. It's a solid workhorse platform, which is extremely versatile.

73 de VK3JED / VK3IRL
http://vkradio.com